Mobile Banking customers are reminded to be vigilant in protecting their non-public information from unauthorized access and use.

Best user practices and electronic safeguards can help protect you from fraud, identity theft, malware, and phishing scams. Mobile devices, such as smart phones, pads, and tablets are not immune to security threats. Consider acquiring and keeping up-to-date one of the reputable mobile device security applications. American Bank and Trust Company does not make recommendations on security products offered in the marketplace for a user's mobile devices. However, authoritative reviews are typically available on the Internet when conducting a search for mobile device security products.

Don't point your device's Internet browser to unfamiliar websites, advertisements, or click on links within unfamiliar or unsolicited messages. Don't click on unfamiliar text links that maybe sent from an unknown number or a recognized number as it may also be a malware attack. When in doubt, use communication alternatives other than the Internet to validate legitimate websites with inquiries to trusted resources. Be observant and always verify that the website address you are visiting exactly matches, "character-by-character" the website address you intended to visit. Set up your desktop and mobile devices to automatically lock out when not in use and require a strong personally-chosen password for access that you periodically change. Use a unique password or passphrase at each website where you engage in transactions involving your financial relationships or sensitive non-public personal information. Do not save or store your security passwords on your mobile device.

Please be assured that American Bank and Trust Company strives to follow financial industry technology best practices, and has not encountered any data compromises. However, the Bank's staff periodically receives reports from individuals and businesses that have been victims of phishing scams or have become aware that their household or business system was hacked on their premises. Often, the basic security vulnerabilities of not periodically changing passwords, readily believing something that's "too good to be true" in an unsolicited offer or unexpected message, clicking on an unfamiliar link embedded in a message, not canceling user accounts for services no longer used, keeping a list of user access information in an electronic file on an Internet-connected device, or not keeping virus protection / firewall protection up-to-date with the most recent releases on a household or office system have been the recurring root causes of problems reported by victims.
Your on-going awareness and personally exercising best practices to protect your non-public data will help you avoid being a victim of fraud or identity theft.